Continental Knitting

 

vs. English Knitting

 

 This video demonstrates knit and purl stitches in both the English and Continental knitting styles, plus offers a teeny bit of background and history of each style too. What a bonus!  The idea is to give you a clear overview of the differences between English & Continental knitting, in case you don't know which one to learn first, or you're curious about what different ways of knitting are out there. I go through everything nice and slow so you can see the detail.

In summary, a tassel is simply made from several equal lengths of yarn, which are then folded in the centre. Instead of measuring each strand out, a quicker way is to wrap yarn evenly around a rectangular container or piece of card, before then cutting the yarn along one side. Ta-dah! Equal lengths of yarn.

To then attach the tassels, you can:

a) push a crochet hook from back to front through your knitting where you want to position the tassel, hook onto the centre of the tassel and pull it partly through, put your thumb and index finger through the loop in the tassel, grab onto the tail end of the tassel, pull it through the loop, then tighten into a knot.

OR

b) wrap a short length of thread around the centre of the tassel strands, feed the thread tails into a plastic yarn needle, feed the needle through the knitting from front to back, pull the tassel partly through too, put your thumb and index finger through the loop in the tassel, grab onto the tail end of the tassel, pull it through the loop, then tighten into a knot.

 

I hope this has been useful to you :)

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